Proving you cannot do sedentary work: Visual, environmental, and other limitations

If you are not yet 50 years old, you will very likely need to convince the Social Security Administration that you can’t do most sedentary jobs in order to obtain benefits. Limitations in your ability to stand, walk, sit, and use your hands and fingers, as discussed in the preceding posts, may establish that you cannot do sedentary work.  Other limitations that can be important in proving your inability to perform sedentary work include visual limitations, environmental restrictions, and various other medical conditions.

Visual limitations

Working with small objects is required in most sedentary unskilled occupations. The number of sedentary jobs you can do will be significantly reduced if you have a visual limitation that prevents you from seeing small objects.  Similarly, the sedentary jobs you can do will be substantially reduced if you are unable to avoid ordinary hazards in the workplace, such as boxes on the floor, open doors, or approaching people or vehicles.

Environmental restrictions

An “environmental restriction” is an impairment-caused need to avoid an environmental condition in the workplace, such as extreme cold or heat. Restrictions to avoid exposure to noise, dust and other respiratory irritants, and odors, if extreme, may significantly limit your ability to do a full range of sedentary work.

Other medical conditions

Your ability to perform sedentary work may be affected by other medical conditions, such as the following:

 

  • Dizziness
  • Headaches
  • Pain
  • Seizures
  • Inability to hold the head in flexed forward position
  • Skin conditions
  • Medical treatment including its frequency, duration, and disruption to routine
  • Medication side effects
  • Bladder or bowel problems that require frequent rest room use
  • Need to maintain a colostomy or ileostomy

 

An Ocala disability lawyer can review your medical records, identify all the limitations that may affect your ability to work, and determine how to best present the evidence to the Social Security Administration.  For a free evaluation of your claim, contact experienced Ocala Social Security disability attorney Claudeth J. Henry. You may fill out the form on this page or call (352) 304-5300, whichever you prefer.